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Youtube Words: Markiplier – Words and Drunk Minecraft

This is MarkiplierMarkiplier - Doublefinger

Markiplier knows a lot of bad words (Post)

Markiplier - 6 - Unique, Both Word Count2

Markiplier says them a lot (Post)

14 - Markiplier - number words per series

Markiplier plays a lot of Minecraft with his friends.

12 - Markiplier - Number of videos per series

Markiplier and his friends talk a certain way when playing Drunk Minecraft.

6 - Markiplier - Word Profile - Drunk Minecraft - Uncommon Word Freq

And they also use mean words with each other a lot.

8 - Markiplier - Word Profile - Drunk Minecraft - Sentimental Uncommon Word Freq

Markiplier and his friends start off talking a lot but stop talking a lot when they play for a long time.

9 - Markiplier - Word Profile - Drunk Minecraft - Avg Word use over time

Markiplier and his friends also get more mean if they play for a long time.

13 - Markiplier - Word Profile - Drunk Minecraft - Moving Avg Uncommon Sentimental Word Use OVer Time

This makes us both happy and sad.

Continue reading “Youtube Words: Markiplier – Words and Drunk Minecraft”

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Youtube Word: Markiplier – Language Per Series

This is Markiplier

Markiplier-Chins

Here is a post about the bad words that Markiplier knows.

Markiplier - 6 - Unique, Both Word Count2

Markiplier has played a lot of games

11 - Markiplier Number of Videos

Markiplier has also played the same game a lot.

12 - Markiplier - Number of videos per series

Markiplier says nice things and bad things when he plays a game.

13 - Markiplier number of videos per series, color sentiment

When Markiplier plays a game, he can talk a lot.

14 - Markiplier - number words per series

And Markiplier has something nice to say, usually.

15 - Markiplier - number words per series, color sentiment

But for some games, Markiplier can say a lot of mean words

16 - Markiplier - number bad words per series, color sentiment

And some games, Markiplier only has mean words to say.

17 - Markiplier - number bad words in worst sentiment seires, color sentiment

Markiplier can be mean sometimes.

Continue reading “Youtube Word: Markiplier – Language Per Series”

Youtube Words: Markiplier – Language Usage

 

This is a Markiplier.

Markiplier-Chins

Markiplier has a YouTube Channel.

YT screenshot 1

Markiplier knows this many words.

Markiplier - 1 - Unique Word Count

Some words are just additions of other words.

a-hole, b-street, c-sharp.

This means that Markiplier knows less words than before. (Thanks YouTube Subtitles)

Markiplier knows good words and bad words. Most of them are good words.

Markiplier - 2 - Unique Word Count, Colored By Sentiment

But Markiplier says bad words a lot.

4 - Unique, Bad Word Count

And Markiplier says meaner bad words than good ones.

Markiplier - 5 - Unique, Both Word Count1

Markiplier also knows more mean words than nice words.

6 - Unique, Both Word Count2

But that’s ok. We still enjoy Markiplier =)

Continue reading “Youtube Words: Markiplier – Language Usage”

Gaming on Data: Gaming Script – Who is this Written For, Third Graders!?

Gaming Scripts series:

Language and Aggressions 

Language and Aggression over time 

Word Usage and Aggression

3Number of Unique Words color sentiment

A game from the 30,000 foot view, with its intricate battle mechanics, handcrafted scenery, and illustrative storytelling leaves an impression with the player.

Over the past few days, we’ve looked closer and closer at the storytelling portion, the words and transcriptions that are used and the impression that it leaves on the game.

We’ve only previously looked the words that have been said but not about how difficult it was to hear.

42 - Easy Ready - Flesch Grade - Sentiment

So this is how a game’s script reads. At least looking at the Flesch Kincaid Grade scale, it says that even the more difficult of scripts can be read by a 6th grader; 3rd and 4th graders can manage with the majority of the script as well.

Continue reading “Gaming on Data: Gaming Script – Who is this Written For, Third Graders!?”

Gaming on Data: Gaming Script – By the Word We the Intent

Gaming Scripts series:

Language and Aggressions

Language and Aggression over time

3Number of Unique Words color sentiment

Recap from first post :

Looking at a game and its script as a whole, it’s easy to get an understanding of what kind of game it will be. Having violence in a game is one thing, but having the characters in the game be in distress about it are two different things. You play the game and it stresses you. You don’t necessarily become immersed to the characters but the tension does rub off on you.

12- Game Script - Lang use over time, only NonNeutral minus 10k a-g 13 - Game Script - Lang use over time, only NonNeutral minus 10k h-u

Continue reading “Gaming on Data: Gaming Script – By the Word We the Intent”

Gaming on Data: Gaming Scripts – Aggression over time. A long time.

Gaming Scripts series:

1 – Language and Agressions

3Number of Unique Words color sentiment

Touching back on what we found out in the previous post was that games, in general, use aggressive language considerably. Granted this is from a small sample size of AAA titles, but are titles that permeate through the gaming community. Required reiterating in-case there are new readers to this post who hasn’t read the last one, yet. (Cough, cough.)

But the last post looked at a game as the sum of its parts and not the parts that made up that sum.

6 - Game Script - Lang use over time a-g 7 - Game Script - Lang use over time h-u

And there’s a reason for that. The parts of a game’s script are a bit messy, jumbly and noisy. The above is the running average of the sentiment, the polarity of aggression where negative (red) denotes more aggressive language and positive (green) denotes more friendly language. But these graphs for the most part are bit too noisy to make sense of them aside from the general feeling that a game is. Comparing say the Call of Duty games, where there’s very little green up top but a whole lot of red underneath, makes it easy to assume that its language is more aggressive in nature than say Portal 2 where the opposite is true with its green hair and ginger public area.

Continue reading “Gaming on Data: Gaming Scripts – Aggression over time. A long time.”

Gaming on Data: Gaming Scripts – Language and Harsh Undertones

We play a game and absorb a lot of created by the developers. Gorgeous tropic landscapes; the honks, footsteps and clatter of an urban environment; the dialectic change for stepping into 1950s New York in the Bronx. The developers and artists and writers put a lot of time sculpting and crafting their environment and it leaves an impression on you. When you put down Assassin’s Creed 2, aside from the killing, freerunning, building scaling that you do, you also absorb a bit of 15th century Italy. The architecture becomes recognizable, the attire becomes familiar and you learn many of the ins and outs of getting around the city. This very much thanks to the developing teams request to keeping the game period perfect and because of that, a part of the game seeps into us and we learn from it and grow from it.

For this short iteration of Gaming on Data, I got a bit curious about the scripts behind the game, the writing for the game because gaming is just as much a visual distraction as it is a conceptual one. Much of the writing that a player comes out of the characters that interact within it, so that’s what I focused on.

For this, I scraped the internet for a few scripts for somewhat current AAA titles are prolific in that they cause a large impression on the gaming community. But finding these scripts is not easy, so I managed to only get the following:

Scripts Scraped:

  • Bioshock
  • Bioshock 2
  • Bioshock Infinite
  • Call of Duty – Black Ops
  • Call of Duty – Black Ops 2
  • Call of Duty – Ghosts
  • Call of Duty – Modern Warfare
  • Call of Duty – Modern Warfare 2
  • Call of Duty – Modern Warfare 3
  • Curse of Monkey Island
  • Grand Theft Auto 4
  • Half Life
  • Half Life 2
  • Mass Effect
  • Mass Effect 2 (Incomplete)
  • Mass Effect 3
  • Portal
  • Portal 2
  • Red Dead Redemption
  • Secret of Monkey Island
  • Elder Scrolls: Skyrim
  • Uncharted
  • Uncharted 2
  • Uncharted 3

1Number of Unique Words in Gaming Script

The above is a graph showing the number of unique words within each game and something obvious jumps out: RPGs and Open World games have a lot of text. Not even by a small margin, like a significant margin.

Continue reading “Gaming on Data: Gaming Scripts – Language and Harsh Undertones”

Gaming on Data – League of Legends LCS 2015 Winter Split – The Best Around by any (K-)Means Necessary

LCS Winter 2015 Split has just finished for League of Legends and it’s time to start crunching some numbers to see how these top ranked players compare to one-another. Several Disclaimers: This post is a big graph heavy, but I’ll try and explain each of them as much as possible; there might actually be some code that some of you might want to skim over; all data was gathered from the Fantasy LCS view that is given for Stat tracking, so data might not be as granular as I’d like and not many features to compare against.

Stats given from Fantasy LCS

  • Average Points per Game (AP)
  • Total Points for the Split (TP)
  • Kills (KI)
  • Deaths (DE)
  • Assist (AS)
  • Creep Score (SC)
  • +10 K/A (KA)
  • Multi-Kills (not used)

Omitted Stats: 

  • Players who didn’t play the majority of the Split were omitted from analysis, 12/18 Games Minimum

Continue reading “Gaming on Data – League of Legends LCS 2015 Winter Split – The Best Around by any (K-)Means Necessary”

This is your Gaming on Data: League of Legends and Selecting a Champion

It’s not about your potential power, but the power that you display.

                Selecting which character you want to spend your gaming life with is a difficult choice, no matter how temporary the experience. You choose your character depending on what you think looks cool, what role you want to play as, what you think will get the job done when push comes to shove, how well you can synergize with your teammates. You’ll be spending the next game life becoming accustomed to your character and your team’s characters so you want to choose someone that you won’t regret spending that life as.

League-of-legends-logo

League of Legends is no exception to this, and with over 100 characters to choose from, 5 roles and a number of different play styles for each character and role, a player has a lot of choices to make in deciding how their next gaming-lifespan will be experienced. Not all play-styles work so some people take up the task of writing up guides on how they play, what works for them, what items to pick up and contingencies based on who you are playing with or who you are playing against. Sites like Champion Select, Solomid and Mobafire where guide writers impart their wisdom with certain characters and prospective new comers learn and rank what guides work best.

I’m not here to talk about which guides are better than others, but to research and impart knowledge of which characters the League Community likes best.

Continue reading “This is your Gaming on Data: League of Legends and Selecting a Champion”

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